About – Stanley C Lewis

A welsh Artist born in Monmouthshire in 1905.Stanley was greatly influenced by his Royal College of Art and Slade peers – amongst them Augustus John, Gilbert Spencer, Charles Mahoney and Edward Bawden.  Absorbing much from this rich artistic background Stanley soon emerged with a distinctive voice of his own, producing compositions with strong graphic outlines where figures verge on, but fall short of, caricature. Stanley was much inspired by the teaching and facilities of the Royal College of Art and was quick to find his own distinctive voice.  His characterization of figures – verging on, but stopping short of caricature – was to define his most distinctive work from this point on. Quote from Stanley, ‘ I attempted the Rome Scholarship twice.  It was the highest possible award – the most coveted prize among art students.  First in 1930, I painted an Allegory symbolic of Farm life in those days when I  was a little boy 1905-1915.  I was judged the runner up.  William Rothenstein wrote a letter to say I should try a second time.  This time I painted a 10 by 5 foot of Hyde Park.  I worked hard and the painting was so large that I realised I needed more than three months to do it justice, but sadly, I ran out of time!  This time I was placed third – so that ended by Rome School adventures!’ Remarkably almost all of the works Stanley submitted for both scholarship attempts have survived.

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1 thought on “About – Stanley C Lewis”

  1. Peggy Banks said:

    It’s lovely to see this unusual art once again – brings back some lovely memories from the exhibition at Bedford Gallery, Peg

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